COP21 Paris - 1.5ºC Limit recongised by world leaders as dangerous

COP21 Update - Major Economies Declare Support for 1.5°C

Recognizing this change of position, now 108 countries have clearly voiced support for the 1.5°C target, including the first major developed economies. The move echoes rapidly growing support voiced by states and global civil society for the calls of the CVF’s Manila-Paris Declaration on long-term temperature and mitigation goals. On 1 December, the momentum was highlighted when the Forum was given the rare “Ray of the Day” international award, followed by expressions of support for 1.5°C by celebrity activist, Mark Ruffalo.

 

Philippine delegation chief to COP21, Secretary Emmanuel de Guzman said: “This is historic. The call of the vulnerable has been answered by the presidency of the COP and the largest economy of the EU host region. The momentum for raising the level of ambition in Paris now opens the exciting possibility for a truly historic and transformational summit. We salute France and Germany and call for more countries to join in the call for 1.5°C to protect human rights globally.”
 
French President Francois Hollande declared in his speech to COP21 needed to set a credible path “to sketch out a credible path allowing us to limit global warming to below… 1.5C if possible.”
 
Germany’s official spokesperson declared today that “the 2-degree goal is too little. 1.5 degrees must be mentioned in the climate treaty. That is the position of the Federal Government [of Germany].” [unofficial translation]
 
“The dangers we face at less than 1 degree of warming remind us of the inadequacies of the current 2 degree target and the need for a long-term mitigation goal to guide strengthened party contributions consistent with the most ambitious but feasible target of 1.5°C. We invite countries and civil society groups alike to declare support for limiting warming to a maximum and strongly encourage engagement with our #1o5C campaign [www.1o5C.org]. Join us in fighting for the right to survive and thrive,” said Secretary de Guzman.
 
On 30 April 2015 the CVF conveyed a submission under the UNFCCC mandated 2013-2015 Review of the Convention’s long-term goal of 2 degrees, including a report by the Special Procedures of the United Nations Human Rights Council that remains under the active consideration of the Paris conference this week. The lead author of the report, endorsed by 23 independent UN human rights experts, the UN
Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment, Prof. John Knox, commented on the conclusions of the report dealing with human rights and the impact of 2 degrees of climate change:
 
“Warming of 2 degrees will have a major impact on the full enjoyment of a wide range of human rights. Incremental increases in impacts and risks, even those associated with shifting from warming of 1 to 2 degrees, adversely affect the enjoyment of human rights to life, health and food, among others. Even at current warming levels, many vulnerable communities around the world are already seeing adverse effects on their human rights, from melting permafrost to more destructive storms. To fulfill their obligations to protect human rights, States should do everything they can to keep warming to a minimum."
 
The Special Procedures report on human rights and climate change is under active consideration by the formal 2 degrees goal review process since June this year. The UNFCCC 2013-2015 Review of the existing temperature goal of 2 degrees is scheduled to hold a final session today at the Paris talks and refer its 3-years of work for consideration by the Conference of Parties. The call to strengthen the current temperature goal was central to the Manila-Paris Declaration the Forum released on 30 November 2015 at the Forum’s third ever High-Level Meeting in Paris.

 

 

More posts by Nick Breeze

Addressing a wine industry on the frontline of climate change, Former President Obama said: “We are speeding our car towards the cliff at a very fast rate”. The audience and former president were invited to the launch of this new initiative by 326yr old port company CEO, Adrian Bridge, who is calling for solutions, saying “what we need to do is stop talking and start doing!” Nick Breeze reports.

 

A three day hearing at the High Court is in process that will decide whether an injunction be granted, effectively preventing any campaigning that might negatively impact the economic interests of UKOG and their associated companies.

 

The Climate Change Act 10 years on: does it matter? Is it fit for purpose? Are our politicians fit for purpose? Chris Rapley speaks candidly about our preparedness for an ever-rising tide of climate impacts that are already having a disastrous effect on nearly all regions of the world.

 

The jet stream is responsible for what kind of weather we experience and it’s behaviour is changing. Dr Jennifer Francis, a research professor at Rutgers University's Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, explains how a combination of factors are going to drastically impact agricultural systems in Europe and Eurasia.

It is easy to look at the fires in southern Europe and think that “global warming” is a regional problem often on someone else doorstep. This misconception could not be further from the truth because the “global” bit refers only to global mean temperature. As scientists start to look at what is happening around the world, it becomes very clear that the interconnected global system is changing for all.

 

Dr. Saleemul Huq Director International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD) at the Independent University, Bangladesh. In this short interview Dr Huq talks about his work and explains how those most vulnerable to the effects of manmade climate change are seeking recompense from the worlds greatest polluters.   

 

In 2014 Marks & Spencer became the only retailer in the world with carbon neutral operations. This huge undertaking across over 1400 stores has been rewarded with international recognition by the UNFCC winning Momentumn For Change award for carbon neutrality.